Last edited by Zulkir
Wednesday, July 29, 2020 | History

3 edition of Apple anthracnose (Bull"s eye rot). found in the catalog.

Apple anthracnose (Bull"s eye rot).

Roy M. Davidson

Apple anthracnose (Bull"s eye rot).

by Roy M. Davidson

  • 369 Want to read
  • 16 Currently reading

Published by College of Agriculture and Home Economics in Pullman, Wash .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Anthracnose,
  • Apples -- Diseases and pests -- Washington (State), Western,
  • Apples -- Diseases and pests -- Northwest, Pacific

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesBull"s eye rot.
    SeriesExtension bulletin -- 0940., Extension bulletin (Washington State University. Cooperative Extension) -- 940.
    ContributionsByther, Ralph S., Washington State University. Cooperative Extension.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination[2] p. :
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17608835M
    OCLC/WorldCa41861611

    Managing anthracnose with fungicides The future for anthracnose management looks brighter with new chemistries and an integrated management approach. Editor’s note: In the late s and early s, anthracnose disease and annual bluegrass weevil caused dramatic losses of annual bluegrass on putting greens in the. Anthracnose canker on apple Anthracnose canker on apple Photo courtesy Dr. Jim Rahe, Simon Fraser University: Perennial canker on apple. Photo courtesy Dr. Peter Sholberg, Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada. Life Cycle Spores from new cankers are spread by rain or overhead irrigation during the late summer and fall months.

    Apple rot and other fruit-rot fungi. Fungi are major causes of plant disease, accounting for perhaps 70% of all the major crop diseases. Some of these fungal plant pathogens are termed biotrophic because they establish an intricate feeding relationship with .   Apple Anthracnose, Bull's Eye Rot, and Perennial Canker are fungal diseases caused by fungi in the genus, Neofabraea. Host plants include crabapples, most pome and stone fruit, shadbush, hawthorn, and mountain ash. The fungus causes cankers on most commonly on younger, smaller branches and bull's eye rot on fruit.

    Anthracnose, caused by the fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, is the most widespread and serious postharvest disease of many tropical fruits including mango, papaya, pitaya, and most damaging phase of the disease begins as a quiescent infection, when the fruit is in the preclimacteric phase of by: 2. Chapter 2 (Page no: 21) Diseases of atemoya, cherimoya, soursop, sugar apple and related fruit crops. This chapter reviews the distribution, importance, aetiology, epidemiology and control of diseases of Annonaceae, together with characteristics of the host ant diseases include anthracnose (Glomerella cingulata), Armillaria root rot, bacterial wilt (caused by .


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Apple anthracnose (Bull"s eye rot) by Roy M. Davidson Download PDF EPUB FB2

Apple (Malus spp.) Anthracnose (Bull’s-eye rot). Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook. Oregon State University. Sutton, Aldwinckle, Agnello, and Walgenbach. Anthracnose canker and perennial canker. Compendium of Apple and Pear Diseases and Pests, 2nd edition See: Apple (Malus spp.)-Perennial Canker (Bull's-eye Rot) Cause Cryptosporiopsis curvispora: (sexual: Neofabraea malicorticis) is the most common fungus while N.

vagabunda (formerly N. alba) and C. kienholzii have also been found in western Washington. The disease is severe in the high-rainfall apple-growing areas west of the Cascade Range and coastal British Columbia. Apple anthracnose definition is - a disease of the apple, pear, and quince in the Apple anthracnose book coast region of northwestern America caused by a fungus (Neofabraea malicorticis) producing limb cankers and especially after storage a rot of the fruit —called also black spot.

: Compendium of Apple and Pear Diseases (Disease Compendium Series) (): A. Jones, H. Aldwinckle: Books3/5(1). Anthracnose is a general term for a variety of diseases that affect plants in similar ways.

Anthracnose is especially known for the damage that it can cause to trees. Anthracnose is caused by a fungus, and among vegetables, it attacks cucurbits. Anthracnose can survive on Apple anthracnose book plant debris and is very easily spread. Apple tree anthracnose: A new fungous disease (Bulletin / Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station) [A.

B Cordley] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Apple anthracnose is severe in the wet areas west of the Cascades in Washington and BC. Anthracnose cankers are often called fiddle-string cankers because long, string-like fibers of the inner bark are left exposed in the center of the canker.

These cankers usually occur on smaller twigs and branches and expand for only a single season. Anthracnose is one of the important post-harvest diseases of apple fruit caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and C. acutatum, resulting in serious damage to the fruits and considerable economic loss in various crops, including apple worldwide (Afanador-Kafuri et al., ; Bajpai et al., ; Lee et al., ; Víchová et al., ).The symptoms of apple anthracnose can be Cited by: Old-time apple varieties is a list of apple varieties commonly found in old Pacific Northwest orchards compiled by R.A.

Norton from an orchard reference book dated Apple Evaluations. Apple cultivar trials were begun in by Dr. Bob Norton. Identification of apple anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum sp. KV and light buff sporogenous tissue, but in many isolates only darkening of the mycelium with age occ17). Apple Cankers and Bull's-eye Rot * Bulls-eye rot can be caused by anthracnose canker from fungus Cryptosporiopsis curvispor or by perennial canker from fungus C.

perennans. The disease is severe in the high-rainfall apple-growing areas west of the Cascades and British Columbia and is one of the most serious postharvest diseases ofFile Size: 62KB. Anthracnose control begins with practicing good sanitation.

Picking up and disposing of all diseased plant parts, including twigs and leaves, from the ground or from around the plant is important. This keeps the fungus from overwintering near the plant.

Proper pruning techniques to rid trees and plants of old and dead wood also helps with. Several fungal pathogens are responsible for maple anthracnose, which include: Aureobasidium apocryptum (syn. Kabatiella apocrypta), Discula campestris and Colletotrichum gleosporoides. Hosts All native and non-native maples commonly planted as woody ornamentals are susceptible to infection, such as: sugar (A.

saccharum), red (A. rubrum), Norway (A. According to The Apple Grower by Michael Phillips (revised and expanded edition, Chelsea Green, ), anthracnose typically follows environmental stresses like cold, drought, or pruning injury.

The best control is removing and burning infected parts of the tree. Apple anthracnose does not have the concentric rings of woody tissue in the canker. Each ring indicates the disease's progress for 1 year. As the canker enlarges from year to year, it cuts off more of the sap-conducting tissue, reducing the growth and bearing capacity of the tree.

Anthracnose is a group of diseases that cause dark, sunken lesions on leaves, stems, flowers, and fruits. Anthracnose infects many deciduous and evergreen trees and shrubs and in some regions also infects fruits, vegetables, and turfgrass.

The Compendium of Blueberry, Cranberry, and Lingonberry Diseases and Pests, Second Edition, is organized into four major parts: • Infectious Diseases, including anthracnose fruit rot, bacterial canker, fairy ring, leaf mottle • Noninfectious Disorders, such as cold injury, nutritional disorders, oxygen deficiency injury.

A plant canker is a small area of dead tissue, which grows slowly, often over years. Some cankers are of only minor consequence, but others are ultimately lethal and therefore of major economic importance in agriculture and causes include such a wide range of organisms as fungi, bacteria, mycoplasmas and majority of canker-causing organisms are.

Hi from the Olympics. Vashon, where you are, also is a gorgeous place and with quite the orcharding history from what I understand. Only made it over there once so far, to pick up the Avalon Apple Press from the workshop at Meadow Creature there- great product.

To. Anthracnose is a fungal disease that affects plants by forming dead areas on leaves and fruit. It can attack many different types of plants, from grasses to flowering trees such as dogwood. Found mainly in the eastern United States, the disease causes "dark, water soaked lesions on stems, leaves or fruit,".

Anthracnose fungi overwinter on fallen leaves and twigs that were infected the proceeding year. Infection is favored by cool, moist weather in the spring of the year.

Infection can occur on the vulnerable young leaves when there is a film of water on the leaf surface. Infection is typically more severe on the lower third of the tree, where the.A Resource Book for the Pacific Northwest.

Edited by Elizabeth H. Beers, Jay F. Brunner, Michael J. Willet, and Geraldine M. Warner. Original publication by Good Fruit Grower, Yakima, WA. Orchard Pest Management provides a practical reference on tree fruit IPM.Additional Physical Format: Print version: Eastham, J.W.

(John William), Anthracnose of apple-trees. Victoria, B.C.: W.H. Cullin,